Command structures

Master The DRE commands knowing about their structures

In case you can’t remember all commands, you are welcome to add your own sentences as commands. But the current commands are structured in a way so you should be able to figure them out by yourself.

Most commands can be said in different ways as well, making it easier for you to execute the command you need. Here are a few rules for you to remember, so when you need a special command, you can probably execute the command with this in mind:

[What]

What information do you need?

Example: ‘Best lap time’

[Who]

Who do you need the information on?

Example: ‘in front’

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“Best lap time in front”

More than often, the vice versa is also possible:

[Who]

Who do you need the information on?

Example: ‘Car 86’

[What]

What information do you need?

Example: ‘delta last lap time’

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“Car 86 delta last lap time”

For position

Include ‘car’ or ‘driver’ in the command sentence will provide information about the car ahead or behind classification wise. Example: Who’s the driver ahead of me. Similar when DRE reports ‘The car behind’, this refers to the car behind you in classifications. It might be the car behind you on track as well in a race eg., but it’s not certain.

Next On track

Include ‘track’ or ‘on track’ in the command sentence will provide information about the car ahead or behind directly on the track. Not including the word ‘track’ means you want data on the cars in front and behind on position wise. Example of track sentence: ‘Who’s ahead of me on track’. Similar when DRE reports ‘the car behind on track’, this refers to the car right behind you on the track. It can be any car even from other classes. It’s just the one that closest to you on the track behind you.

Leaders and Lookups

The commands to get information about other drivers than those just around you (class leader, leader, car number, position, names) all have only the following spoken structure where the Who must be the first thing to speak:

  • Class leader last lap time
  • Overall leader last lap time
  • Car 42 last lap time
  • Max Verstappen last lap time
  • Verstappen last lap time
  • P2 last lap time

    To use the specific dynamic grammars, make sure to enable them in Sound -> Recognition

    Dynamic Grammar Toggles

    Your performance

    Short commands like ‘position’ or ‘best lap time’ yield information about your performance

    Mixing and matching

    DRE is built in a way that allows for several spoken combinations for every command. This means it allows you to speak more naturally when commanding The DRE.

    It’s possible to combine commands from the different examples given and not be restricted to just the commands stated.

    For example for moving the brake bias forwards, you could just say Bias up, which is combined from the stated commands:

    • Brake bias up
    • Bias front
    • Brake bias forward

    [Brackets] and ;separators|

    What [time;clock] is it?

    Occasionally, you might stumble upon command grammar phrases like this one.

    • The square brackets [] mean you can variate your phrase to call this command
    • The semicolon ; or pipe | inside the square brackets are simply the separators
    • If the separator ; or | is outside a bracket, it splits the grammar into more sentences

     

    With this simple logic, we can extract two complete phrases from the example:

    • What time is it?
    • What clock is it?

    The {DRIVER} tag

    Some commands have dynamic tags that should be swapped with a specific driver detail when spoken

    [Start|Activate|Begin] delta [time|timing|lap time|] for {DRIVER}

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    “Start delta for Verstappen”

    Replace the {DRIVER} tag with any driver detail such as:

    Name

    • Start delta for Max
    • Start delta for Verstappen
    • Start delta for Max Verstappen

    Car Number

    • Start delta for car 33
    • Start delta for 33
    • Start delta for car number 33

    Position

    • Start delta for P 2
    • Start delta for position 2

    Leaders

    • Start delta for the leader
    • Start delta for the classs leader

    Relative

    • Start delta for ahead/in front
    • Start delta for the car behind
    • Start delta for behind on track

    Contextual

    Shortly after a speaking a command which has the {DRIVER} tag, you can recall the same driver using a contextual like:

    • Start delta for him
    • Start delta for her
    • Start delta for them

    To use the specific dynamic grammars, make sure to enable them in Sound -> Recognition

    Dynamic Grammar Toggles